Conferences and Events in London

QEIICC

The conference industry is young and dynamic and is growing and maturing fast.

The two main British Conference Association have agreed to define a Conference as ‘an out-of-office meeting of at least four hours duration involving more than 10 people’. 

The UK, and London in particular, is one of the favourite destinations for conferences or any other kind of event. 

 

 

These associations have also agreed to define a conference venue as ‘an externally-let facility with a minimum of three meeting/conference rooms and a minimum seating capacity of 50 theatre-style in its largest room.’ 

There are several venues in London which can host conferences, but The Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre (QEIICC) is one of the most versatile venues in its category. It is well situated, in the Westminster area, surrendered by the Big Ben and Westminster Abbey, and it offers world class facilities to host large meetings, with a capacity of up to 2,500, hosting more than 400 events a year.

The QEIICC is government-owned and when it opened in 1986 was a venue specifically for government conferences but nowadays the majority of the QEIICC business is in the private sector, with only around 25 per cent of the Centre’s business related to the government of public sector. 

The marketing strategy of the QEIICC involves a wide range of media, promotional materials, exhibitions, public relations, advertising, client events and digital media, with wide presence and activity in different channels including; LinkedIn, web site blog, and accounts in twitter and Instagram.

On the other hand to succeed in this business is vital to invest in the venue facilities, not only technology but also furniture and décor, and this is some the Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre in London is doing year after year. 

evolving. Following that premise, the QEIICC relaunched in 2014 and keeps quietly 

 

 

Definitely, this is among the best options if you are planning any kind of event or conference in London, so why not to ask for a quote?

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